Tag Archive for: mindset

This is NOT What Retirement Should Be Like

Imagine for a moment that you’re having a conversation over dinner last Friday night with your brother and his wife.  Answering the common question, “what’s new,” he dives right in and shares what he’s been up to.

In addition to the nice home he owns and lives in with his family, he also owns a two-family home in town which he has been collecting rent on for 15 years.

He explains to you that he called up his real estate broker last week on a Tuesday afternoon and asked the broker what she believed he could sell the rental property for that day.  He didn’t want to know what he could sell it for in a month or two, but right then.

Given the demand for a quick response, her answer was $600,000.

He then called back on Wednesday morning at 9:43 a.m. and asked how much she thought he could receive if he sold it then.

He then called back at 11:57 a.m. and asked the same question.

Finally, he called her back that same afternoon at 3:26 p.m. and asked how much she thought he could sell it for then.

Before you called the local hospital for the men in the white coats to come and take him away in a straight jacket, you asked him if he did this often.

“Oh, I do it all the time,” he said.

Why, you ask, do you waste your time if you’re not selling?

“I like to stay on top of things so I know how I’m doing.”

Brother #2

Imagine for a moment that you’re visiting your brother and his wife at their home in Florida.

In the first morning of your visit, you notice that he’s watching CNBC on television and there are two guys shouting conflicting opinions on the impact of The Fed’s latest announcement on raising interest rates on market prices.

As you’re all waiting on him to head out for lunch, you notice that he has Yahoo Finance pulled up on his iPad checking the prices on the different stock market exchanges.

“The Dow is down 120 points,” he laments as you’re walking out the door to the car.

At the conclusion of lunch at the restaurant, he asks the waiter to switch the channel on the television over to CNBC so he can see what the market is up to.

After some shopping in town, you head home in his car.  On the way, he has business radio tuned in on the radio so he can hear how the market closed at the end of the day.

After a nice meal at his home that night, you all settle in to watch Jim Kramer discuss his take on the market activity that day, and what he recommends everybody do in reaction to the day’s events.

After a futile attempt to get him to change the channel over to a comedy show that you can all watch, you gently ask him if he “paid this much attention to the market every day.”

“Of course,” he said.  “Don’t you?”

After replying that you don’t, you then ask him why he does it.

“I like to stay on top of things so I know how I’m doing.”

Questions

  1. Is the behavior by the brother in story #1 any different than the brother in story #2? If so, why?
  2. Is there anyone you know who resembles the brother in story #2?
  3. What is each brother looking for?

These are very important questions I’d like you to ponder for a moment!

What is Your Opinion?

So, what do you think?  Is the behavior exemplified by your brother in story #1 (real estate) any different than your brother in story #2 (stock market)? 

The answer is no.  There is no difference at all!  They’re both equally bizarre and destructive.

The only difference is the investment vehicle they’re using.  

Upon first glance, I suspect the behavior of Brother #1 (real estate) appears more outrageous.  

I also suspect you know someone who mirrors the behavior of Brother #2 (stock market). Perhaps you know someone like this quite well.

We all do and it’s becoming way, way too common.  The media has turned investing into a sport with minute-by-minute reporting of “points” on the Dow.  Why do you think they use that terminology?

The truth is that the behavior of Brother #2 (stock market) is no more bizarre and destructive than the behavior of Brother #1 (real estate). 

Randomly “checking in” via the internet, TV, or your iPhone, etc. multiple times a day to “see how ‘the market’ is doing” is the same as Brother #1 calling his real estate broker on three separate occasions in one day to find out how much she could sell his rental property for at that precise moment. 

Neither accomplishes anything. 

What Are These Two Brothers Looking For?

The bigger question is #3 which is what are they looking for?

What they’re both looking for is a sense of certainty in the short and long run. 

They want to make sure they’re not “falling asleep at the wheel” and missing out.

The reason they have this feeling and desire is their overall “big picture” interpretation, and thus ingrained belief of the world on a day-to-day basis, i.e. that world economies and financial markets are completely fragile, erratic, ungrounded, and out of control. 

And, that the bottom could permanently fall out of their financial lives without any warning whatsoever, and they could be permanently bankrupt because of it.

Please take a moment to go back and read those paragraphs again.  It’s that important.

This is the psychological state of most investors in America today, especially those approaching their retirement transition, and it is my strong opinion that it is not necessarily their fault (in the short run).  

I emphasize “in the short run” because in the long run, everyone has a responsibility to continuously seek the objective truth, and discard everything else which has not objectively been proven to be true.

What the Mainstream Media Feeds Us

What everyone is fed by the mainstream financial media over and over on a day-to-day basis confirms that economies and financial markets are completely fragile, erratic, ungrounded, and out of control.  And, that the bottom could permanently fall out of their financial lives without any warning whatsoever and they could be permanently bankrupt because of it.

If anyone were to take a step back and unemotionally evaluate this assertion, they could and would arrive at the truth which is that it is completely false.  

However, the daunting and fragile picture the financial media paints is not reported because of its level of truth.  It is reported because it keeps millions and millions of viewers tuned in day after day after day.

The Truth About the Financial Media’s Intentions You Must Know

Think about it.  If the financial media can perpetuate this myth, and they can get millions to buy into it, then they condition those millions (like Brother #2) to tune in multiple times each day in order to fulfill their conditioned desire to “stay on top of things.”

If engaging in this activity was of any value to you, I’d strongly endorse it in a heartbeat.  It is not. 

In fact, I recommend doing everything you can to avoid this trap. 

Investing is not a sport, thus scoring it on a minutebyminute basis, as the financial media would like you to do, is not only unhealthy, but it is ineffective as a means of helping you achieve total financial independence.

This does not mean that you should aimlessly bury your head in the sand.  What it does mean is that, in the face of the endless barrage of information coming at you every day, you must exercise extreme levels of awareness of the “intent” of the information, to remember that you are in control, and, above all else, protect your confidence!

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Don’t Let Your Definition of Retirement be a Roadblock!

Imagine for a moment that you have your grandchild sitting on your lap, and you’re telling stories about when you were younger…when all of a sudden, out of the blue, your grandchild asks, “what’s retirement?”

After you get over the shock of hearing that question from your grandchild, and wondering where he or she ever came up with “that one”, stop and think about how you would answer that question?

This is a big issue because how you define retirement is a major factor in how you will live the rest of your life.

Society’s Definition = ROADBLOCK

For years, society has defined retirement as that period of time in your life when you stop working…when you get to enjoy the fruits of your lifetime of work.

For many people I’ve I met with, that definition is perfect. 

For many others, however, that definition is a big ROADBLOCK!

One of the reasons for this is they’re just not ready to stop working.  They’ve done it for so long, and it has become so much a part of who they are, that the thought of not working scares them a little.

What I’ve discovered in studying and working hands-on with so many individuals and couples who now confidently continue their same (or better) lifestyle into their retirement years without worrying about money is that their goal is not necessarily to stop working

They just want to know that they can afford to if they want to.

And, there’s a big difference.  Knowing that you don’t “have” to work changes everything.

A Better Definition of Retirement for You

So, a better definition of retirement that you can tell your grandchild is spending all of your time doing exactly:

  • what you want
  • when you want
  • where you want
  • with whomever you choose

And, most importantly, all without living under the constraints of worrying about money, i.e. with no dependence on a paycheck from work to support you.

If that includes working, great!  There is nothing wrong with that.  In fact, for many of our Relaxing Retirement members, I encourage it.

As long as you’re not working because you think you “have” to. 

That’s retirement!

To experience that, however, requires an abundance of financial confidence. 

One of the biggest challenges I’ve witnessed over the last 30+ years is transitioning from working, receiving a paycheck, and saving money your whole life, to no longer receiving that paycheck from the work you do.

To make matters even more difficult, you then have to begin spending the money you’ve taken your entire life to save.

I understand how strange this feels, so we created The Relaxing Retirement Coaching Program™ to help you implement the essential strategies and mindsets needed for an anxiety-free transition from your working years to your retirement years.

The program helps answer three key questions about your retirement transition so you can free yourself from dependence on a paycheck and enjoy total financial independence:

  1. Do we have enough built up to stop working (if we choose to)?
  2. How much can we afford to spend without the anxiety of running out of money?
  3. How should we position our hard-earned savings to make it last? 

Whether you choose to remain in your current field, migrate to a new pursuit, or start exploring more leisurely interests, you’ll feel prepared and confident making your decisions.

Take advantage of a Free 2nd Opinion Retirement Strategy Assessment and find out if you’re on the right track.  Simply click this link to find out more.

FREE Retirement Strategy AssessmentTM

When Transitioning to Retirement, Reduce Complexity and Consolidate!

After recently losing her father to a long battle with cancer, and having to sort through his estate, one of our Relaxing Retirement members reminded me to share a very important strategy with you so nobody else has to go through the exhausting and unnecessary experience she went through.   

Sorting out all of her father’s bank and investment paperwork took almost two months because it was coming in from everywhere.

When she finally tallied it up, here’s what she discovered.  In addition to numerous bank accounts in several different banks, he had 14 different custodians for shares of stock that he owned, as well as various stock certificates for his original purchases that were located in his fireproof safe in his basement. 

Most of this came about from the break-up of AT&T years ago into all the “Bell” spinoffs like Lucent, Southwestern Bell, Nynex, Vodaphone, Verizon, etc.

In addition to those, he also had 8 different IRA accounts, including 3 in banks and 5 held directly at different mutual fund companies!

In all, that’s 22 different sets of statements in addition to his individual stock certificates! 

Why Did He Have So Many Accounts?

Right now, you must be asking, “OK, why did he have so many accounts?”

As she explained, her father grew up in a household marred by the Great Depression when banks had their troubles and innocent people couldn’t get access to their money.  So, the reason for the different bank accounts was probably to stay under the FDIC insured amount.

As for all of his stock accounts, both inside and outside of IRAs, there’s really no explanation other than he wasn’t aware that he could consolidate them all onto one statement.

Years ago, I had a gentleman in his 70s tell me that the reason for him holding a dozen different IRA accounts was “diversification.”

When I told him that he could keep all the same investments that he had but consolidate them all onto one easy to read statement, he couldn’t believe it.

Why You Should Consolidate Your Statements and Investment Holdings (including Individual Stock Certificates)

He was so conditioned to believe that multiple accounts equaled diversification.

For starters, you can and should consolidate all “like kind” accounts (same title, i.e. joint, etc.) into one account, especially IRAs i.e. Traditional, Roth, Rollover, etc.  This is also true of your retirement plans at prior companies or institutions.

There are several reasons for this, none of which is to boost performance:

  1. Instead of spending time locating statements each month, you can receive one consolidated statement that lists all of your investments broken down by account title.
  2. When it comes time to reallocate or rebalance your investments, you have one source to contact to make the change.  And, that company also does all the record keeping for you.
  3. IRA Required Minimum Distribution (RMD): Once you reach age 72, and you have to begin taking your RMD, you only have to calculate the amount to withdraw from one account, so record keeping is much simpler.  Instead of receiving notification of the required amount to withdraw from several companies, you will only receive one.
  4. Tracking Non-deductible IRAs: Consolidating your IRAs also makes it easier to keep track of non-deductible IRA contributions, and thus accurate filing of your income taxes when you take your annual distribution.  As a simple example with round numbers, if you have $100,000 in IRAs, and $20,000 of that comes from non-deductible IRA contributions over the years, then only 80% of your withdrawal is subject to tax.
  5. On-line access in one location: in today’s world of on-line account access, you can view all of your investment holdings on one website, including your bank accounts.
  6. Last, but not least, it makes it so much easier on your heirs.  Helping our member pull all of this together after the fact reminded me that I take it for granted that everyone knows that you can do this.  Your heirs will be extremely happy that you consolidated everything into one location.

As a final thought, in addition to taking care of this for your family, if your parents are still with us, you may want to approach them about this as well.  It may save you a few headaches down the road!

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Avoid This Investing Mistake at All Costs When Transitioning to Retirement

“Why would anyone just sit there through a downturn in market prices and ‘lose’ money?  Wouldn’t it make sense to just sell everything, wait for the dust to settle, and then buy back in after?”

Although nobody with this thought likes it to be labeled as such, this is classic Market Timing: the strategy of attempting to sell in and out of markets on a timely basis in order to avoid short-term losses and capture all upside gains.  This stems from the commonly held belief, which is perpetuated by the financial media, that investment success is achieved by the few who are “in the know” who are able to successfully “navigate” in and out of markets at just the right time.

It’s sounds 100% logical in theory.  Unfortunately, however, it doesn’t work in practice.

History is littered with proof that this belief is false.  Noted Dartmouth Professor Kenneth French’s extensive research concluded that you would have had to be precisely correct on the sell and buy points 74% of the time in order to equal returns earned by continuously holding shares through all market cycles.

And, that a survey of famous market timers revealed that only a handful were correct more than 50% of the time, and the best was still at only 66%!

October 2007 to March 2009

History and distance from traumatic times have a way of providing clarity for future action.  However, at first glance, that’s not always true with investing.

Now that more than a decade has passed, the massive market downturn we experienced over 18 months during “The Great Recession” from October, 2007 to March, 2009 appears to be a period that anyone and everyone should have been able to navigate in and out of successfully.

What we all forget with time, though, is that we didn’t experience that 18-month period of time in one instance.  We experienced it one day, and in some instances, one hour at a time.

From October 10, 2007 to March 9, 2009, broad stock market prices fell almost 57% from peak to trough.

However, it was not a straight line down that was obvious to interpret and act on.

Experiencing Markets on a Daily Basis

Similar to what we’ve experienced over the last two months, during that 18-month timeframe, if you recorded market results on a daily basis, here’s what you would have experienced:

  • Market prices closed up 46% of the days, and
  • Market prices closed down 54% of the days

Isn’t that incredible!  During the 18-month period of time when market prices fell over 50%, market prices closed up about 173 days (46%) and down about 202 days (54%).

I’m sure you expected it to be much worse than that with a much larger percentage of down days.  (For reference, from 1973 through 2015, market prices were up 53% of days, and down 47% of days.) 

So, as we experience markets on a day-to-day basis, that 18-month period wasn’t that different than the average.

What this demonstrates is that, when dealing with markets, our experience is never a straight line up or down.

Instead, it’s more like: up one day, down the next, down the next, up the next, up, up, down, down, down, up, down, up……

That’s how we experience markets, and that’s what makes market timing impossible as a long-term strategy.

Why Market Timing is So Hard

You not only have to make the correct call to sell out, and then to buy in on the correct days, but you have to make those calls at precisely the correct time during each day because prices change all day long.  (And, because all asset classes behave and perform differently, you have to make those split-second decisions on each asset class you own.)

Just think of markets during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic where prices moved as much as 12% in one day!

Although it feels as if there was throughout time, there is never a clear and unquestioned signal in the moment when a decision must be made to sell or buy.  Never!

That’s why buying into the belief that you can successfully time when to get out and when to get back in is so destructive to your financial independence.

Put It in a Drawer

After you have set aside five years’ worth of your anticipated withdrawals outside of the short-term volatility of stocks, i.e. in money markets and short-term fixed income holdings, and directed all dividends you earn to flow into your money market fund to support your lifestyle cashflow needs, the long-term solution with the rest of your Retirement Bucket™ is to remain globally diversified and strategically weighted across multiple asset classes during all market cycles with a goal of capturing the long-term higher expected returns each asset class offers.

And, then “put it in a drawer” and go about living your life.

Go ahead and pull it out of the drawer during pre-determined periods of time, i.e. once a quarter, half year, or yearly, and rebalance your holdings back to your originally prescribed mix.

However, as we have just highlighted, do not delude yourself into thinking that looking at it on a daily, weekly, monthly, or even quarterly basis will make you more knowledgeable, provide you with any signals to act on, or produce better results.

What this allows you to do is remain confidently invested for the rest of your life knowing you will not be forced to sell your long-term stock index funds during a temporary market correction in order to provide needed cashflow to support your desired and well-earned lifestyle.

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The False Belief Too Many Retirees Have Which is Damaging Their Investment Results

Most Americans walk proudly and carefree when market prices are climbing.

Risk becomes irrelevant. Strategic asset allocation looks boring, and disciplined diversification gets called into question because some asset classes outpace others. Many begin to lament not having all of their money in the winning asset class over the last year.

The fact that markets correct all the time and have experienced many ugly stretches during their historic long-term climb is a distant memory.

And, then………the market hiccups!

We experience a normal, garden variety correction, like the 14% intra-year price drop we’ve experienced each year on average since 1980.

The financial media jumps at the golden opportunity to increase viewership ratings by stirring the pot and perpetuating the myth that “this time is different.”

Microphones are placed in front of innocent retirees who claim, “I’m worried. At my age, I don’t have time to make it back.”

Investing for the long term sounds great when you’re in your 30s, 40s, or 50s, but I’m 60 years old. I don’t have time to make up for any losses.”

Does this sound familiar? Have you ever had a similar thought?

If you have, I can assure you that you’re not alone. I can also tell you that it is unnecessarily in the way of you enjoying the Relaxing Retirement you deserve.

Whenever markets experience sharp corrections during their retirement years, the investment time horizon for too many Americans quickly shrinks.

While increases in market prices are typically met with apathy as I mentioned above, or reservation, i.e. “it can’t or won’t last”, sharp declines in market prices are greeted with the gut feeling of permanence, i.e. “it sounds really bad this time. I don’t think it will ever come back in my lifetime!

If you study financial news reporting, you will find a version of this story during every market correction. So much so that the we don’t have time to make it backmantra is treated as an indisputable fact, one which governs investment decisions for the majority of Americans during their retirement years.

However, this dominant sentiment is not supported by facts.

Long-Term Purchasing Power

We invest to solve a long-term problem, not a short-term one. And, that problem is purchasing power.

Take a look at what you spend money on. If history is any guide, outside of a few items, prices will be significantly higher in the future if for no other reason than the stated goal of the Federal Reserve is an inflation target 2% per year.

Given this, in order for us to maintain our desired lifestyle, our income must increase substantially over our lifetime. This is not a want. This is a need.

Our income must increase. And, in order for our income to increase, our Retirement Bucket™ of investments must increase in value over time in order to generate that lifestyle sustaining income.

In short, our shared problem is a long-term problem, not a short-term one. If our lifespan truly is that short as the quote suggests, stock market corrections would have no significance.

First, we wouldn’t own stock index funds because stocks solve a long-term problem.

And second, although potentially uncomfortable to think about, if we did own stocks and market prices temporarily dropped right before our demise, our beneficiaries would inherit and maintain ownership of them while prices corrected back.

How Long is Long Term?

With all of this talk about time, i.e. “I don’t have time to make it back”, let’s examine the facts about just how long is “long-term” using Average Life Expectancy information from mortality tables used by life insurance companies and social security:

  • Life expectancy for a 60-year-old individual is 25.2 years. However, the joint life expectancy of a 60-year-old couple, i.e. the average life expectancy for the survivor in a 60-year old couple is 30.9 years, i.e. just shy of 91 years of age.
  • For a 70-year-old couple, their joint life expectancy is 8 years (age 91.8)

Take a moment to let these numbers sink in.

Assuming for a moment that you are just “average” (chances are very good that if you’re reading this you’re well above average), where are you in these numbers?

For example, if you’re a 60-year-old couple, your number is 30.9 years, so your personal investment time horizon is 31 years! If you’re a 70-year-old couple, your investment time horizon is still 22 years, i.e. the length of time your Retirement Bucket™ of investments must last!

Stock Market Corrections

With your investment time horizon firmly in your mind, now let’s examine historical market corrections and the amount of time it took to “make it back.”

** For simplicity, we will use the S&P 500 Index as a proxy for the market as it provides a long history to track and encompasses a large portion of the market value.

From 1945 through 2019 (74 years after World War II ended), there have been 93 market pullbacks of significance (5% or more):

  • 59 of them were between -5% and -9.99% with the average drop of 7%.
  • 22 of the pullbacks were between -10% and -19.99%, with an average of price drop of 14%. It took an average of 5 months to reach the bottom, and 4 months to recover back to the original price before the drop.
  • Of the remaining 12 pullbacks, 9 of them were between -20% and -39.99%, with an average of price drop of 26%. It took an average of 11 months to reach the bottom, and 14 months to recover back to the original price before the drop.
    • Adding those three together illustrates that 90 of the 93 pullbacks over the last 74 years have fully recovered in 14 months or less, with 81 of them (87%) recovering in 4 months or less.

Investment Time Horizon

With these historical facts, let’s now return to those Average Life Expectancy facts and your investment time horizon to determine if the often-heard quote, “Investing for the long term sounds great when you’re in your 30s, 40s, or 50s, but I’m 60 years old. I don’t have time to make up for any losses” is valid for you.

Let’s assume for a moment that you have followed The Relaxing Retirement Formula™, i.e. you have determined precisely what it costs to support your desired lifestyle, and how much of that must be withdrawn each year from your Retirement Bucket™.

You have set aside multiple years’ worth (5 is a very safe number to start with) of your anticipated withdrawals held outside of your broadly diversified stock index funds, in money markets and short-term fixed income instruments which do not experience volatility levels like stocks.

You then strategically and broadly diversified the remaining balance of your Retirement Bucket™ of investments across a spectrum of stock asset classes using cost-effective index funds weighted toward areas of higher expected return, and you allowed all dividends you receive to accumulate in your money market to support your anticipated withdrawals instead of being reinvested. (a very important distinction)

If you are that 60-year-old couple, your investment time horizon 30.9 years, is the I don’t have time to make it back mantra factually valid?

No!

Even if we experienced what has happened only three times in the last 74 years and it took 58 months (just shy of five years) for market prices to return, you still would not have had to sell any of your broadly diversified stock index funds at a loss to free up funds to support your needed withdrawals because, in addition to allowing your dividends to build up in your money market, you already had those funds set aside outside of your stock index funds.

The reality is that your investment time horizon is a lot longer than you may think, and if you adhere to The Relaxing Retirement Formula™, you do have time!

Knowing this should give you enormous confidence to spend what you have planned to spend no matter what the current market conditions are at the moment.

How to Develop the Confidence to Retire

One of the biggest emotional, social and financial challenges you’ll ever face is the transition from working, receiving a paycheck, and saving money your whole life…to no longer receiving that paycheck from the work you do.

And, to make matters even more challenging, you then have to begin spending The Retirement Bucket™ of investments you’ve taken your entire life to build in order to support your lifestyle!

If you are like our Relaxing Retirement members who developed the disciplined habit of aggressively saving money during your working years, flipping the switch and now spending what you’ve saved doesn’t feel normal.  It just feels strange!

With guaranteed pensions now a thing of the past, even dedicated savers who have done a great job building up a sizable Retirement Bucket™ of investments are not 100% convinced they have enough.

So, they end up working longer than they need to because they think they have to.

Or, worse, they stop working and retire, but because of their fear of making a costly mistake and running out of money, they “pull their punches” and restrict their spending, and end up having to live like the masses who have to say: I can’t afford that.  I’m on a fixed income now.”

Like most dedicated savers faced with the prospect of freeing themselves from their dependence on their paycheck and relying on their Retirement Bucket™ of investments to support them, you may lack the financial confidence to flip the switch from saving what you’ve earned to spending what you’ve saved.

Unfortunately, all those years of discipline and saving, of building up money and investing it, are of no value to you now if you don’t have the financial confidence to spend it.

If this resonates with you in any way, then the best news I have for you, after running a retirement coaching program to help dedicated savers navigate this transition for over 30 years, is that none of them were born with the necessary financial confidence.

They developed it. 

And, so can you!

Retirement Confidence Has to Be Developed

As your Retirement Coach, if you’ll allow me to be that in this series, I want to help you transition to the life you deserve free of dependence on a paycheck.

And, like any great sports coach, we’re going to help you install your Retirement Game Plan, yoursystem,” by revealing and helping you implement the retirement coaching strategies, tools, checklists, and mindsets we’ve developed over the last 30+ years so you can start living the life you’ve earned 100% on your terms.

I look forward to visiting with you in the next edition.

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What is the essence of America? Fighting and maintaining that perfect, delicate balance between freedom to and freedom from.

I was having a great discussion with one of our Relaxing Retirement members about the state of affairs over in Ukraine and how incredibly fortunate we are to peacefully live our lives at the same time that all of the destruction and loss of human life is taking place.

It reminded me of the wonderful quote above by Marilyn Savant which I passed on to this member after our Zoom call. It really captures what we’re all about so I thought I would share it with you today as well.

I would even expand on the quote a bit and say the freedom to pursue your own rational self-interest, while enjoying the freedom from anyone using any form of force or fraud against you in your pursuit.

This is essentially what drove everyone to America in the first place, and hopefully what still drives them here today.

Every once in a while, especially during times like these when we’re witnessing the atrocities over in Ukraine, we all need to take a giant step back and think long and hard about how fortunate we are to be living in this day and age. And, most importantly, right here in the United States.

Because we all lead such busy lives, most of us never take the time to appreciate what we have, not to mention what we’re capable of experiencing.

When we all read and listen to all the complaining about everything that is wrong and how “someone” needs to fix it, I can’t help but think that a lot of people need a little contrast to gain some historical perspective.

If you’re a history buff like me, then you know that up until the 20th century, the world was quite a barbaric place. With everything we now have at our disposal, it’s easy to forget that.

Prior to the 20th century, unless you were in the elite ruling class, you were subservient to some form of a dictatorship or governing monarchy empowered with the right to control every aspect of your life.

You had absolutely no control of your life. None!

Dream, plan, and work for a better life for you and your family? Forget it.

There was no upward mobility and no opportunity to change your lot in life without using brute force to get your way.

Contrast that with today here in America where, for the most part, we have the ability to exercise our own judgment, and choose what we believe to be best for our own well-being (as long as we don’t use force or fraud to deny anyone else the right to pursue the same for themselves).

This basic and profound right did not exist prior to the creation of America.

Stop and think about how incredible that is, and the life it allows you to live if you choose.

Don’t miss the opportunity to take full advantage of it to live the life you’ve earned at every turn, especially while you still have the health and vibrancy to enjoy it.

Part II: How to Get What You’re Entitled To

In the last edition of RETIREMENT GAME PLAN, we talked about the misery of coming home from vacation to find that your home has been robbed and vandalized. 

A really smart way to ensure that you receive everything you’re entitled to under your homeowner’s insurance policy is to hire your own public insurance adjuster which is similar to hiring an attorney to represent your best interests in a court of law.

One of the challenges, however, is that even with the best public insurance adjuster, you will never receive what you’re entitled to if you can’t recall everything you owned that was destroyed or vandalized.

In other words, after living in a home for 30+ years, and under the duress of a catastrophe to your home, and the trauma of dealing with the loss, the last thing you’re going to want to do is sit down and try to remember every little detail about your home and its contents.

It’s right up there on the list with having your appendix removed without anesthesia!

The chances of you being able to remember everything in your home, the date you purchased it, and the current value, etc. are slim to none.

Since the amount of your claim that you’re entitled to is dependent on you being able to do this perfectly, what should you do?

Step One

My recommendation for years has always been to film the contents of your home with a video camera

However, in today’s day and age, the video capability of an iPhone or iPad does the trick!

Film the outside of your home from all directions.  While you’re doing this, talk into the camera and explain it as you’re filming it, especially anything out of the ordinary.

Then, film the contents of each room and closet in the house talking your way through everything.

Lastly, take a white sheet and spread it out on your dining room table. 

On the table, place any valuables you have.  Specifically, items you have scheduled on your policy: jewelry, china, silver, furs, etc…  And, then film what you’ve laid out, again talking into the camera and describing what you’re filming.

The Most Important Step to Getting What You’re Entitled To

Assuming for a moment that you filmed this with a traditional video camera, don’t keep the video tape in your home when you’re finished filming.  If the house burns down, the tape will burn along with it!

Instead, keep it in a fire proof safe, or in a safe deposit box at the bank.

If you filmed your home using an iPhone or like device, make sure to back up the videos in your Cloud account or somewhere other than in your physical home. 

Again, if you do so on the hard drive of your computer, it will burn in a fire as well and your great work will be lost.

Insurance Claim Time

When you have an insurance claim, you simply retrieve your video and hand a copy to your public insurance adjuster and insurance company. (Keep a copy for yourself.)

There will be no confusion whatsoever as to what you’re entitled to.

Would it be better if you also had receipts for every purchase you’ve made over the years?  Yes.  That would help tremendously. 

However, most people have not saved all of their receipts, so if you fall into that category, don’t sweat it.  Just go ahead and film everything right now. 

Your insurance company won’t be very happy with you, but if you ever have a claim, you’ll be very happy you took this step.

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Insurance Claims: Get What You’re Entitled To

Imagine for a moment that you’re driving home from the airport after one of the most memorable vacations of your life.

The weather is poor and the “haze” of being on vacation begins to lift.

As you begin to deal with an annoying case of “back to reality blues”, your mind can’t help but begin to plan when you can get back there again. 

You turn down your street, pull into your driveway and enter the garage. 

The contrast from being on vacation is always strong, but you begin to have the feeling that something really is different.

No, it must be your imagination.  You’ve been away for a while and you’re just out of your element right now!

As you enter the house, your jaw hits the ground as it becomes apparent that someone has been in your house while you were away. 

In fact, your entire house has been turned upside down. 

Then, the reality hits you: “WE’VE BEEN ROBBED!”

You drop your bags and run around looking for what’s missing.  It’s hard to tell because you’re so disoriented. 

As you do this, you can’t help but notice a funny smell. 

After 15 minutes of running around trying to figure out what those hoodlums took, you open the door to your finished basement.

“Uh-Oh”!

Your beautiful finished basement has over a foot of water on the floor!  And, as you trudge around down there, you see what the problem is.

Whoever robbed you thought it would be funny to break a window in your basement, turn on your garden hose, stick the hose through the broken window, and let water run in your basement until you return!!

This is a Nightmare!

After shutting off the water and patching the window, you collect yourself and try to think of what you should do first.

Call your homeowner’s insurance company?  Maybe. 

But, let’s stop and think about this for a minute. 

Is it in your insurance company’s best interest to pay you the biggest claim settlement they can, or the smallest? 

Well, of course, the answer is the smallest.

So, how can you make sure that you’re getting everything you’re entitled to get under your homeowner’s insurance policy?  And, at the same time, get your house cleaned up and back to normal?

“Public” Insurance Adjuster

One way to make sure is to immediately hire a public insurance adjuster

In addition to helping you maximize the settlement you’re entitled to in a timely manner, a public insurance adjuster relieves you of the paperwork burden by handling everything for you. 

And, because that’s all they do, they raise helpful points that you wouldn’t have even thought of.  (Especially in the middle of a crisis)

The analogy is going to court without an attorney to defend your rights.  Most people wouldn’t think of doing that. 

The same holds true if you suffer a loss to your property.  You want to make sure that you receive everything that you’re entitled to after paying insurance premiums your entire life.

Having a public insurance adjuster handle your entire claim from start to finish, including hiring cleaning companies, dealing with contractors, compiling the list of damaged or stolen property and assigning the replacement value, etc., allows you to concentrate on what’s most important to you, and that is getting your home back in order as quickly as possible.

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How to Evaluate Social Security Benefits for Your Spouse Before You Retire

In the last edition of RETIREMENT GAME PLAN, we took a long look at the math behind claiming your social security benefits by walking through a case study of a 62-year-old couple, Bill and Madeline.  

In this edition, let’s dig deeper into the rules surrounding spousal benefits.

To begin with, Madeline worked over her lifetime so she’s qualified to receive social security benefits on her own.  However, when her children were younger, she stopped working for periods of time, so her benefits are significantly lower than Bill’s.

How to Evaluate Spousal Social Security Benefits

There are two ways of calculating Madeline’s benefits. 

Even if she never worked over the course of her lifetime, Madeline is still entitled to one-half of Bill’s benefit at the very least (depending on when she decides to begin collecting as we’ll discuss shortly).

Since she’s also eligible for benefits due to her own employment history, Madeline has a decision to make as to which set of benefits to collect.

For example, let’s assume for a moment that Bill waits to collect his full social security benefits (FRA) of $3,000 per month at his age 66.4.

Given this, Madeline’s spousal benefit is $1,500 per month at age 66.4 as Bill’s wife.

If Madeline’s social security benefits from her employment are greater than $1,500 per month, she would begin benefits under her own employment records.  However, if they’re less than $1,500 per month, she will collect spousal benefits.

Other Issues and Strategies to Think Through Before You Choose

  1. Let’s assume that Bill continues to work until his Full Retirement Age (FRA – age 66.4), but Madeline chooses not to.  Bill would then wait until at least age 66.4 to begin collecting his social security benefits, thus Madeline could not begin collecting “spousal” benefits. 

    However, Madeline could begin receiving benefits under her own account due to her earnings history.  Assuming for a moment that those benefits are lower than her spousal benefits as Bill’s wife, Madeline’s benefits would then bump up to the higher spousal benefit amount once Bill begins collecting his benefits. 
  2. If Madeline has reached her full retirement age (FRA), she may begin collecting spousal social security benefits even if she continues to work past her FRA and accrue benefits under her own account.  When she later stops working, if her benefits are greater, she may then choose to switch her social security benefits from “spousal” to benefits from her own employment account.  This scenario assumes that Bill already began collecting social security benefits because spousal benefitsmay only begin when the second spouse has initiated benefits.  
  3. If Bill began receiving his benefits at age 62, his actual benefit would have been $2,200 per month (75% of his full retirement age benefit at age 66.4).  Even though Bill began receiving his benefits at age 62, Madeline may decide to wait to begin receiving her spousal benefits at her age 66.4. 

    *** If she chooses to do so, she doesn’t receive 50% of Bill’s reduced benefit of $2,200 per month (for beginning his benefits at age 62). Madeline would receive 50% of Bill’s full retirement benefit ($3,000) as if he began receiving benefits at age 66.4, or $1,500 per month.
  4. If Madeline decided to begin receiving her reduced spousal benefit of $1,050 per month at age 62 (35% of $3,000 per month instead of 50%), she may not later draw an increased spousal benefit amount at age 66.4.
  5. Assuming for a moment that Madeline was younger than Bill, she may not begin collecting any social security benefits before she reaches age 62.  (The exception is if Bill passes away.  In that case, assuming she has no dependent children, Madeline could begin collecting at age 60.)

As you can see, there is a lot of room for confusion and these decisions are not as clear-cut as you may like them to be.

The key is knowing the rules and fully weighing all options before you begin collecting your benefits so that you can receive the largest amount you are entitled to receive.

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The Math Behind When to Start Collecting Social Security Benefits

As I shared in the last edition of RETIREMENT GAME PLAN, a new Relaxing Retirement member had a host of questions surrounding social security this past month so I thought it would be a good idea to share my thoughts with you as these are questions I receive all the time.  (To protect their privacy, I’ll refer to them as Bill and Madeline)

Since they were both age 62, one of their first questions was, “should we start collecting social security now, or wait until Full Retirement Age, i.e. age 67?”

As I explained to Bill and Madeline, there are 2 major factors to consider before collecting social security benefits before your “full retirement age.”  In the last edition, we began with “the penalty” if you begin too early.  Today, let’s explore the second major factor: The Math.

#2: The “Math” Behind the Decision

The second factor to consider is the math.  Since Bill is the one considering working part-time after he retires from his full-time work, he’s the one we are going to focus on today.  Madeline’s decision is actually different and we’re going to expand on her options in a little while. 

Bill’s social security benefits statement shows that his monthly benefit at age 67 will be $3,000 per month.  And, if he begins collecting at age 62, his benefit will be $2,100 per month.

If Bill starts collecting now, he’s going to take a 30% pay cut!  That doesn’t sound too great, does it?

However, he really needs to take a look at the math for a moment:

  • Monthly Benefit at age 67 (if he waits)         $3,000
  • Monthly Benefit at age 62 (today)               $2,100

If he takes his benefit today, Bill is going to receive $900 less per month.

What This Math Really Means for You

As I pointed out to Bill and Madeline, if they decide to wait until Bill reaches age 67, what they’re really saying is that it’s worth it to wait 5 years (or 60 months) to get the extra $900 in the 61st month and beyond.

However, another intelligent question to ask is “what are they giving up by waiting”? 

What they’re giving up is 60 months (5 years from age 62 to age 67) of social security benefits.  That’s $126,000!

Not an insignificant number.

The “Break Even” Age

In order to recoup that $126,000 that they would give up by waiting until age 67, Bill would have to live another 140 months after age 67, or 11.67 years, at which time he’d be 78.67 or 79 years old.  ($126,000 divided by the incremental increase of $900 at age 67 = 140 months)

So, in order to break even, Bill and Madeline would have to live another 16+ years (4 years from age 62 to 67 + 12 years = Age 79).

And this doesn’t take into consideration 3 other factors:

  1. Bill and Madeline are eligible to receive a cost of living increase each year on their social security benefits, so their benefits will begin increasing after their first year of collecting. 
  2. If Bill and Madeline begin collecting at age 62, they could invest their monthly check and potentially earn even more.
  3. Finally, and this is the most important factor in maintaining their lifestyle sustaining income over the rest of their lives, if they don’t draw from social security right now, they must draw income from some other source, i.e. their Retirement Bucket™ of investments. 

    Delaying social security reduces their inflation fighting investments more rapidly because they have to make up for the income social security would have provided, thus reducing the amount their heirs will receive at their death because social security benefits end at your death.

    And if the majority of their investments are in IRAs or other retirement plans, it may potentially reduce them even faster because they have to pay income taxes on 100% of what they withdraw vs. a maximum of 85% of their social security income.

Other Factors for Bill and Madeline to Consider

While Bill and Madeline’s example should give you a good guideline to use, here are some other factors which may affect your own unique situation:

  1. Life Expectancy:  Bill and Madeline are both in good health and have no overriding problems.

    The reason why this is a factor in their decision is that if they have health issues that are predicted to shorten their life expectancy, clearly this should lead them to collect benefits as early as they can get them. 

    As it was in Bill and Madeline’s case, however, if everyone in your family has lived well into their 90s, this may pull you in the opposite direction.
  2. Severance: If you’re collecting severance pay from the employer you’re retiring from, this may alter your desire to begin collecting right now because of the taxes you’ll pay on your social security benefits while you’re also receiving large severance pay.
  3. Deferred Compensation: This same principle applies to deferred compensation.  Let’s say that for the 5 years prior to your retirement transition, you’ve contributed to an executive deferred compensation plan.  If the plan calls for you to receive a payout immediately upon retiring, as many of our members do, this may have adverse tax consequences on your social security benefits.
  4. “Other” Income: If you have other “locked in place” income, you have to weigh the after-tax benefits of collecting social security benefits early. 

    This dovetails into a major principle that I recommend, and that is to never make any decisions concerning benefits or investments without also simultaneously considering the tax consequences. 

    This is a monumental mistake that I see in way too many situations. 

As you can see, there are several factors that went into Bill and Madeline’s decision.  Hopefully, their example provided a good line of questions for you to answer in your own unique set of circumstances.

In the next edition, I’m going to delve into the questions Madeline had about collecting her social security benefits.

Surprising to many, benefits collected by working and non-working spouses vary greatly if you don’t know the rules.

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When Will You Start Collecting Social Security Benefits: The Penalty?

A new Relaxing Retirement member had a host of questions surrounding social security this past month so I thought it would be a good idea to share my thoughts with you as these are questions I receive all the time.  (To protect their privacy, I’ll refer to them as Bill and Madeline)

Since they were both age 62, one of their first questions was, “should we start collecting social security now, or wait until age 67 (social security’s definition of Full Retirement Age?)”

As I explained to Bill and Madeline, there are 2 major factors to consider before collecting social security benefits before your “full retirement age.”  Today, let’s begin with “the penalty” if you begin too early:

#1: The “Penalty”

To begin with, the reason why Bill and Madeline have a decision to make is because they’re both 62 years old, and Bill still wants to work a little when he retires from his full-time job this month.  (A very common phenomenon we see)

He was told that there is a penalty for taking his social security benefits if he still earns income from work.

He’s partially right.  There’s a lot of confusion about what those penalties are, so let’s quickly outline the limits.

First, when you reach the FRA “full retirement age”, you can earn as much as you want from work (earned income) and still receive your full social security benefits without any reduction in benefits. 

How Social Security Defines “Income” When Calculating Your Pre-FRA Benefits?

Only income you receive from work, whether that income is reported on a W-2 or 1099, is counted for social security income calculation purposes.

Income you receive from pensions, rental property, dividends and interest, and capital gains do not factor into the equation. 

Between Age 62 and Full Retirement Age (FRA)

As Bill is facing right now, the dilemma comes when you want to begin collecting benefits before your FRA “full retirement age”. 

Currently, from age 62 until the year you reach FRA (likely 67 for you), you lose $1 of social security benefits for every $2 of “earned” income over $19,560 (in 2022).  That’s $1,630 per month.

So, for example, in Bill’s case, since he’s 62, if he continues to work part-time, and he earns $19,560 from his new part-time work, he can still collect his social security benefit without any reduction in benefits penalty. 

However, if he earned $43,560 from his part-time work, that’s $24,000 over the limit, so social security would withhold $12,000 (or $1,000 per month) from his social security benefits (i.e. $1 withheld for every $2 you earn over the limit).

During the calendar year in which Bill reaches is Full Retirement Age (67), he would lose $1 in benefits for every $3 he earns in excess of $4,330 per month/$51,960 per year.

So, if you’re like Bill and you are planning on still working after you “retire” from your full-time position, you’ll want to consider these limits. 

Bill’s Earnings Limit When He Starts to Collect Social Security

An important distinction to note, however, is that you can earn as much as you want during the year you’re going to start collecting.  These limits only apply on a monthly basis once you start collecting social security benefits.

If Bill retired at the end of September this year, and he has already earned $190,000 this year through September, the “earnings” litmus test does not apply to the $190,000 he’s already earned this year. 

It only applies during the first month he begins collecting benefits.  So, from October through December, he can earn an additional $4,890 ($1,630 x 3 months) and still collect his social security benefits without a reduction in benefits “penalty.”        

Stay tuned for the next edition where we explore the second major factor you must consider before collecting your social security benefits: The Math!

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After You Retire, Is Dental Insurance Worth it?

While assisting new Relaxing Retirement members with their transition to Phase II of their financial lives (i.e. retirement) this past month, we were reviewing which group insurance coverages to continue when he fully retired from his company.

In addition to the obvious question about the best health insurance option to choose, the next question was “I assume we should also continue our dental insurance plan?

By the nature of the question he asked, it appeared obvious to him to continue, and it may to you as well, but I recommend giving it some serious thought to make sure that it is “insurance” you’re buying.  After all, his price tag was $120 per month!

If you’ve worked for a large company for some time and you are used to having dental coverage at little or no cost to you, you’ve become accustomed to having it.  It’s usually cost effective under those circumstances and a nice fringe benefit.

However, when you have to foot the entire monthly premium by yourself during Phase II of your financial life, you have to really step back and take a good look at what you’re getting.

3 Questions You Must Ask and Evaluate About Any Insurance

When evaluating any form of insurance, you have to ask yourself three questions:

  1. “What is my potential financial loss if I don’t have this insurance?” 
  2. “What is the probability that I’ll suffer this loss?”
  3. “Am I willing to risk absorbing this entire loss myself, or should I pass on some or all of the risk to an insurance company by paying a premium?”

As an example, when evaluating homeowner’s insurance, the obvious answer is, “I’ll lose my entire house in a fire and have to pay a large chunk of money out of my pocket to rebuild it!”  Now that’s a financial loss worth insuring (at the right cost). 

However, if the cost to rebuild your home in the event of a total loss is $350,000, but the homeowner’s insurance premium to insure against that loss is $350,000 per year, you wouldn’t run out to buy that policy! 

There’s no insurance going on there.  The insurance company has not absorbed any of the financial risk from you.  All they’re doing is holding your $350,000 to give back to you in the event of a loss.

Is There Really Any “Insurance” Here?

In many instances, this is what’s going on with dental insurance.  The typical policy pays for a couple of cleanings and a diagnostic exam each year (x-rays, etc.), and possibly a filling. 

After that, the policy usually only pays about 50% of your cost for a comprehensive procedure such as a crown or a bridge. 

If you stop and evaluate it, the financial loss of having to pay for cleanings, exams, and even a filling every year is minimal.  That is typically not a financial risk worth insuring because all you’re doing is getting back the premium you’ve paid. 

The real financial risk is the cost of the comprehensive procedure like two current members are dealing with right now where the cost is in excess of $25,000! 

This is where you have to evaluate and speak with your dentist about not only the probability of your requiring a procedure like this, but what your dentist’s price would be to perform it.

Once you know those numbers, you can evaluate your downside financial risk and whether dental insurance makes sense for you.

The key, as with any form of insurance, is to insure against the “big loss”.  In other words, insure against your house burning to the ground, not a broken window. 

If you follow those parameters with all of your insurances, and increase your deductibles, you can save a good amount of money in premiums every year and free up money for things you’d rather spend it on, like going out to dinner! 

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Lessons About Investing for Retirement From a McDonald’s Franchise Owner

When market corrections occur and the value of your strategically allocated Retirement Bucket of investments declines, it’s extremely useful to put investing in perspective. 

Think about this for a moment…

Assume that thirty years ago, you took the carefully thought-out leap of faith to borrow the necessary funds to buy and operate a McDonald’s franchise (certainly a business we’re all familiar with).

Quite a leap of faith as all of your friends and co-workers thought you were crazy.  Not to mention your spouse!

After attending Hamburger University, and then suffering through a lot of bumps and bruises over the next 18 years, you reached the point where profits were good enough, and you had the confidence to purchase a second McDonald’s franchise.

Throughout the years, you’ve run your stores exactly as McDonalds suggests. You’ve carefully studied your marketplace. You’ve come to really understand and develop a level of confidence with each store’s cash flow during good and challenging economic cycles.  And your profits, while not explosive or in a straight line, have continued to rise over the years.

While it’s been anything but easy, you’re happy with the decision you made thirty years ago as owning these two McDonald’s franchises has provided a very nice income and lifestyle for you and your family.  And, it certainly appears to be able to do so in the future.

Your Big McDonald’s Franchisee Question

What if the person I just described who owns these two McDonald’s franchises was really you?

Imagine surfing the news on-line today and reading these current headlines from Yahoo Finance and Wall Street’s MarketWatch:

  • ”If You Weren’t Yet Worried About the Stock Market, You Should Be Now”, or
  • “Monday’s Nasty Stock Market Reversal is Evidence That the Worst is Far from Over for Wall Street”, or
  • “Here’s Where Investors Are Taking Shelter from Stock Market Turmoil and Fed Hikes”

Here’s your BIG Question: Would you scramble and search for the phone number of a business broker so you could put your two McDonald’s franchises on the market to sell immediately?

After all, the market has been pushing higher and higher to all-time highs, and it certainly looks and sounds like the “bubble” is about to burst.   

Aren’t we due for a big market correction?

What if the Fed changes course and begins to raise interest rates?

What if inflation finally kicks into high gear like the late 1970s after all the Covid relief stimulus money poured into the economy?

What if the new strand of the virus all the experts keep talking about takes hold and we have to go into lockdown again?

What if the gridlock in Washington continues and they can’t get a balanced budget passed?

What then??

Would your McDonald’s franchises survive? 

With a full-blown market crash and recession all but looming on the horizon, wouldn’t it be smarter to just sell your franchises and wait this thing out?  Then, when everything settles down and gets back to “normal”, you can buy another one.

Your Likely Answer

Given everything I’ve shared with you about the owner of these two McDonald’s franchises, I’m confident that you’re laughing right now and shouting out a resounding No Way!

If that’s true for you, why not?  Why wouldn’t you sell your franchises?

Well, to start with, you’re an owner!  You didn’t buy your McDonald’s franchises so you could buy and sell in and out of them in order to gain some sort of short term profit.

Second, you’ve lived through a lot over the last thirty years.  You know what you own.  You’ve seen how they perform during up and down market cycles, and your experience tells you that the long term impact on your McDonald’s businesses from any and all of these reported “crises” is highly likely to be next to nothing.

What’s the Difference?

So, what is the difference between you owning a McDonald’s franchise as I’ve described vs. you owning any investment you currently own?

Please take a moment to pause and really give some thought to this.

The only difference is if you choose to “operate” the McDonald’s franchise, i.e. “work in the business” on a day to day business.  However, many franchise owners own multiple units and don’t work “in” the business at all.

Aside from that, it’s exactly the same. 

When we all invest, what are we doing?  We’re all buying ownership shares of various companies.  That’s what investing is…ownership

And, we own and accumulate shares in many companies because we need to own assets that have the ability to rise in value over time and generate increasing levels of income (dividends) in order for us to maintain our lifestyle in a continuously rising-cost world. 

This is such a critical distinction for your future. 

When we listen to and watch the financial media on a day to day basis, and we listen to friends, family members, and co-workers talk about investing, this is not what we hear.

We hear them talk about “the stock market” as if it’s this mysterious and scary thing. 

The “stock market” is simply a mechanism to buy and sell ownership shares in thousands of companies throughout the world. 

That’s it. 

It’s a collection of thousands of enterprises whose current value and dividend levels will each rise and/or fall over time based on their ability to generate profit and income for their “owners.”

So, when you invest, you’re not “buying” the stock market, per se.  You’re buying an “ownership” stake in one, or hopefully in your case, thousands of companies just like buying a McDonald’s franchise.

And, buying and owning shares of well-run companies is a lifelong venture for everyone who has a goal of generating income that can keep pace with the rising cost of your lifestyle.

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When You Retire, Where Should You Draw Funds From?

One of the questions I receive quite often is, “how do you determine where we should draw funds from when we need money from our Retirement Bucket™ of investments?”

It’s a very important question.

All other variables held constant for a moment, we’re always looking to “free up” funds in the most tax efficient manner, i.e. have you pay the least amount of taxes you’re legally obligated to pay when you withdraw funds to support your desired lifestyle.

And, at the same time, we recommend maintaining the same prescribed Retirement Bucket™ target allocation post withdrawal.  This is a very important point that you can’t afford to overlook. 

You don’t want your withdrawal to leave large holes in your carefully targeted Retirement Bucket™ strategy.

How to Think About Funds Held Inside Your IRAs

If you only have funds to draw from held inside of IRAs, the only variable you need to consider is “when you’ll withdraw the money. 

For example, when asked by one of our Relaxing Retirement members (who has all of their funds in IRAs) to free up $120,000 for them to loan to their son for the down payment on a new home, the big question is “when,” not where.

They hadn’t given it much thought, but I asked when the closing for his son’s home was to take place, i.e. did he need the entire $120,000 before the end of the year? 

I asked because I know where all of their taxable income comes from each year and withdrawing $120,000 (“net” after taxes) from their IRA in one year would cause a large chunk of that withdrawal to be taxed at a much higher marginal tax bracket.

If they were able to withdraw part right now and the other part in January of next year instead of all of it this year, that would save them a minimum of $11,500 in federal income taxes in the process.  This doesn’t count state income taxes.

This strategy is called “Income Tax Straddling.

As it turned out, the closing was to take place in January, so they were able to follow this lead and save that $11,500 which can now go toward something they really want to spend that money on!

Home Equity Line of Credit

Had they needed all of the money before the end of the year, we may have recommended that they withdraw half from their IRAs now and the other half temporarily from a home equity line of credit. 

Then, in January of next year, they could withdraw the second half from their IRAs to pay off the line of credit.  This would have the same effect as my first recommendation, i.e. Income Tax Straddling.  And, because borrowing rates are at historic lows right now, the cost to do this would be minimal.

Had the funds only been needed on a shortterm basis, I may very well have recommended utilizing a home equity line of credit instead of an investment withdrawal, especially during times like these when interest rates are so low.

Saving $11,500 is something that is possible for you, but only if you ask the right questions and you have all the necessary information in front of you.  Paying more taxes than you’re legally obligated to pay is not an act of patriotism.  It’s laziness!

In the next edition of RETIREMENT GAME PLAN, we’re going to outline how to free up the cash you need in a tax-efficient manner when withdrawing from Non-IRA accounts.

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When Investing for Retirement, Be Aware of Which “Hat” You Have On

During periods of turmoil and above average volatility, there’s a very distinctive habit that all successful investors have formed when preparing for their retirement transition.

That habit is making a clear distinction between which “hat” they’re wearing, and properly managing their “state” to match it.

Let me give you an analogy first.

In life, we all wear many hats.  For example, a few of them for me are:

  • Father
  • Husband
  • Business
  • Retirement Coach
  • Brother
  • Friend
  • Sports Coach
  • Conscientious American

To be effective, each of these roles requires me to have a certain mindset or “state.”

However, the correct mindset for one is unlikely to be the correct mindset for another.

For example, if I’ve been intimately engaged at the office all day, I had to have my “Retirement Coach” or “Business” hat on.

And, that requires a very specific mindset or “state” in order to be effective.

However, when I’m home over the weekend, for example, in order for me to be the father I want to be, I need to have my “Father” hat on.

If I still have my “Retirement Coach” or “Business” Hat on when I’m home, how effective (and pleasant) am I going to be?

For reasons I’m certain you can visualize, it’s going to be a disaster!

How Does This Apply to Your Retirement?

Let’s carry that same analogy forward to another example.

In life, due to our experiences, upbringing, education, and interactions, we all develop our own unique set of belief systems.  And, over time, those belief systems morph into our own personal philosophies which, in turn, govern the way we feel about and the way we react to various situations.

As an example, each of us has a belief system about justice and the way things “ought to be” when it comes to the role government and business plays in our lives.  This certainly flares up right around tax time each year.

Let’s label this your justice consciousness” hat!

As such, when we sit back and listen to any political figure on either side of the aisle discuss tax policy, environmental policy, or the economy in general with our “justice consciousness” hat on, each of us has beliefs about what’s wrong, who’s to blame, and how it should be fixed.

Some more strongly than others!

At the same time, each of us has developed an “Investor” hat.  Hopefully, that’s based on a very specific, rational, long-term focused system like our Relaxing Retirement Formula™.  

And, in order to be effective, you wear that “Investor” hat, and the proper mindset that comes with it, when making investment decisions.

When Things Get Ugly After You’ve Retired

Now, here’s distinction…..

When things are good financially, i.e. no big crisis going on, cash flow is good, and markets are moving in a positive direction, it’s easier to make the distinction between which “hat” you should wear to be effective at which time.

It’s easy to be rational and look at the long-term, big picture.

However, when things get ugly like they are right now during this Covid-19 pandemic, i.e. a crisis brews, markets turn upside down, the media outlets pile it on thick, and our reptilian “fight or flight” mechanism flares up, it becomes much harder to draw the line as to which “hat” we should wear. 

The result during times like this is an inability to distinguish between which hat we’re wearing, and with it, the inability to be effective in any area of our lives.

For example, when you’re watching wall to wall coverage of the Covid-19 crisis on television, it’s highly likely that your “justice and health consciousness” hat is on your head.   

That’s normal and perfectly effective for the moment.

However, it becomes dangerously ineffective when all of the emotions and fight or flight triggers that come with it are carried over to your investment decisions. 

And, that’s what happens to the overwhelming majority of investors during their retirement transition.

Everything’s fine while markets move in a positive direction.  However, when markets temporarily correct and move the other way (as they’ve always done and always will in the future), their rational, educated, long term “investor” hat gets thrown out the window.

In contrast, the investors who achieve the best results are those who make a very clear distinction between the two and are very conscious as to which “hat” they’re wearing at all times.

This allows them to make consistent, disciplined, and effective decisions that are in line with their carefully drawn-out plans.

The Strategy

So, the Strategy I recommend for you is to be very aware and conscious of which “hat” you’re wearing at all times. 

There’s nothing wrong with wearing any of them.  The challenges come when you mix hats or wear the wrong hat for the wrong situation.

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Don’t Let it Take a Crisis to Prioritize Your Retirement Transition

Now in my 32nd year in this business, I can say without any reservation that I have thoroughly enjoyed every day I’ve spent in it.  I continue to wake up each morning before any alarm clock excited to get my day going. 

With the exception of owning and running an NFL franchise, for which I’m only a couple billion dollars short at the moment, I can’t even remotely imagine ever doing anything else. 

With that said, as I’ve shared with many of you over the years, the one downside of our business is having Relaxing Retirement members, whom we’ve known and worked with intimately for many, many years, become sick and pass away.  Even in situations where we know they’ve been through treatment for a while, it’s always awful when we receive the news, especially when they’ve occurred in bunches.   

In a single two-week period, I learned that one of our members, a woman I’d worked with for years, had been diagnosed with leukemia, and that another member’s rapidly progressing Alzheimer’s now required he not be left alone. I heard from yet another member that his wife, after five years in remission, was back in the hospital, and soon to start a new round of chemotherapy. And finally, one of our newer Relaxing Retirement members who had only retired last year, developed a degenerative nerve disease which had already cost him much of his eyesight.

So, why am I sharing all of this sad news with you?  I’m sharing it to motivate you not to wait! 

Another Wake Up Call

The convergence of all of this sad news has provided another one of my life’s “wake up calls.”

We’ve all heard the phrase, “don’t wait for a crisis in your life to motivate you to prioritize and do what you really want to do.”

It would be great if it didn’t take a convergence of sad news to people close to you, or a crisis to get us to think and prioritize differently.

For me, one of those crisis events occurred when my mother got sick and passed away at the very young age of 57 when I was 20 years old. 

After dealing with the reality of losing my mother (unfortunately, she was terminally ill for 19 months), the lesson for me was to never wait to do anything because you never know when it can all be taken away from you. 

I would certainly have preferred that it didn’t take losing my mother for me to learn that lesson and prioritize a little better.

Compound Interest

One of the great advantages of “Phase II” of your financial life is that you are free of your dependence on your paycheck to support your lifestyle, and of the daily pressures you had to face at work.  However, without the deadlines and structure that work provides, some people feel lost.    

That’s why it’s so important, whether you’re still working, or if you’ve already stopped, to give significant thought on an ongoing basis to what you want most out of life, and then get busy doing it. 

As you objectively look around at all the people you know and see, something becomes obvious: certain individuals are more successful and happy than others. 

Not only that, but in stark contrast to most people whose optimism fades with age, these same individuals are more energetic, enthusiastic, and confident.  I see this clear as day among our Relaxing Retirement members. 

There are many explanations for this, but the number one reason for a loss of momentum during the “retirement” stage of life is a lack of constant and never-ending prioritizing and goal setting.  Without it, everyone loses their sense of direction and confidence.

Instead of being excited about what lies ahead, too many retirees become increasingly nostalgic about their youthful years, and the “good old days.”

However, those who continuously clarify and act on their priorities, goals, and plans benefit from the law of compound interest, i.e. just like with money, the more you invest in visualizing and working toward a better future for you and everyone around you, the better your future automatically becomes.

Part of this ongoing process is being keenly aware of the amount of time you spend in what I refer to as “bad energy environments,” i.e. in activities and with people who drain your precious energy.  A mentor of mine once labeled them, “batteries not included,” i.e. they drain your energy and confidence.

Always Progressing

The most exciting part of life is knowing that you’re progressing toward something.  And, that’s why it’s so important to have ongoing written goals and plans, not just weakly stated ones like new years’ resolutions that quickly turn sour. 

Your retirement years provide you with a new lease on life.  You now have the opportunity to clean the slate and spend all of your time doing what you want, when you want, where you want, and with whomever you choose.  

However, that doesn’t just fall into place without careful thought and action.  To get what you really want, you have to plan and act constantly.

As I shared earlier, life can be short.  Don’t let it have to take a crisis in your life to realize this. 

Get out there and soak it all up.  Be busy!  Be exhausted! 

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What All Retirees Can Learn from The Ageless Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones

My wife Colleen and I had the pleasure of seeing The Rolling Stones play at Gillette Stadium in the summer of 2019, and we were thrilled that we made the “investment” to see it!  It was nothing short of spectacular and inspirational at the same time. 

I was the youngest of four children (by 5 years) and I can vividly recall spending many happy hours in my older brother and sister’s rooms listening to Stones albums.  Clearly, I wasn’t the only one to have this childhood experience because the entire packed stadium of 55,000+ sang every word to every song!

What blew us away was watching Mick Jagger captivate the crowd with his singing and dancing, still 100% on his game….at the soon-to-be age of 76!  Yes, 76! He was awesome!  All of the band members are in their 70s, they’re still playing, and they’re still good!

Jagger didn’t stop moving for one minute and still had the same command of the audience he had 30 years ago.  He appeared ageless.  What an inspiration!

As Colleen and I were discussing his motivation while driving home (clearly not money as his net worth is in the hundreds of millions), I shared with her some of the conversations I’ve had with so many of our members over the years about why they still do what they do well past the point of “needing” to.  (I strongly recommend taking a moment to read the excerpt from my book The Relaxing Retirement Formula on this very topic of refusing to adhere to conventional and severely limiting societal definitions and norms surrounding the concept of retirement and creating your ideal lifestyle.)

I shared our inspirational experience of the ageless Mick Jagger this morning with a very active Relaxing Retirement member who just turned 90 and still manages his commercial real estate property in addition to an extensive social and travel schedule.  I jokingly stated, “I’m not sure I know of two more inspiring examples.  What’s everyone else’s excuse?”

His response was so prophetic that I have to share it with you, “Others age because they listen to constant reminders that they are getting old. And unfortunately, they start believing it. We are constantly reminded by well-meaning family members (our biggest “enemies”) of all the things we can’t or shouldn’t be doing. Turn a deaf ear and mind to all that b.s.  If you think old and act old then, guess what…you’re old. Shoot me.“

Wow!  How’s that for an answer! 

I wonder what Jagger’s response would have been! 

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Develop Your Retirement Priorities with The Mayonnaise Jar and Two Cups of Coffee

Several years back, one of our Relaxing Retirement members exposed me to this tale and I thought it was a terrific analogy for all of us to take to heart.

Enjoy this…

The Mayonnaise Jar and Two Cups of Coffee

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle… When 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and 2 cups of coffee.

A professor stood before his philosophy class with some items in front of him.  When the class began, he picked up a very large and empty industrial sized plastic mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls

He then asked the students if the jar was full. 

They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into a jar.  He shook the jar gently.  The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. 

He then asked the students if the jar was full, and they agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar.  Of course, the sand filled up everything else. 

He asked once more if the jar was full.  The students responded with a unanimous “yes”.

The professor then produced two cups of coffee from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space between the sand. 

The students laughed!

“Now,” said the professor as the laughter subsided.  “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life.  The golf balls are the important things—your family, your children, your health, your friends, and your favorite passions—and if everything else was lost, and only they remained, your life would still be full.”

“The pebbles are the other things that matter like your work, your house, and your car.”

“The sand is everything else…the small stuff.  If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls.”

“The same goes for your life.  If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are most important to you.”

“Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.  Play with your children.  Take time to get medical checkups.  Take your spouse out to dinner.”

“Play another 18.  There will always be time to clean the house and fix the disposal.”

“Take care of the golf balls first—the things that really matter.  Set your priorities.  The rest is just sand.”

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the coffee represented.  The professor smiled.

“I’m glad you asked.  It just goes to show you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of cups of coffee with a friend.”

* * *

Well said! 

Take a minute and write down what your golf balls and pebbles are. 

It’s never too late to re-prioritize.

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Total Financial Independence by Playing The Odds – Part II

In the last edition, I walked you through a spirited conversation we had with a friend over dinner about health, and my statistical findings on the leading causes of death from The World Health Organization’s website www.who.int.

This was all sparked by our friend’s comment, “All your exercise and attention to healthy eating is great, but there’s no guarantee you won’t still drop dead of a heart attack.  My father and grandfather both died of a heart attack before they were 62.”

What we discovered through our research was that 71% of all deaths world-wide (and 88% in high income countries like the United States) are related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs), i.e. not an epidemic and not an accident.

And, that among the four leading NCDs, the startling commonality is that they are not random, and not genetic.  They’re primarily brought on by lifestyle choices and the physical effects these choices have on our body:

  • Eating: what do we eat, when do we eat, and how much do we eat?
  • Drinking: how much alcohol do we consume? How much water do we consume?
  • Smoking
  • Exercise: how often, and what type
  • Stress
  • Sleep: how much do you get, and what’s the quality of your sleep?

In health, it’s 100% true that you could get hit by a bus and die.  It’s also true that genetics plays a role in your longevity.

However, as The World Health Organization statistics suggest, your lifestyle choices have a much greater impact on your health, vitality, and ultimately, your longevity.

If you have a sincere desire to be healthy and live a long life, why would you not play the odds?

Study how to eat better, drink much more water and less alcohol, stop smoking cigarettes, exercise rigorously on a daily basis, etc.

Those like our friend who choose to focus on the role that genetics or accidents play in our long-term health, etc. prefer believing it’s out of their control because it absolves them of any responsibility or role in the outcome.  After all, “there’s no guarantee.”

What they’re really saying is they prefer not to make the proper choices and, instead, just do whatever feels good in the moment without any regard to the long-term ramifications.

It’s easier to say it’s out of our control, it’s random, or it’s predetermined.

However, that’s a rejection of the reality that we all have the freedom to make the choice to play the odds at every turn and reap the rewards the statistics demonstrate.

I know I run the risk of that coming across as mean spirited when pointing this out.  Or, that I’m not sympathetic.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  My mother died of a brain tumor which later spread to her lungs at the age of 57.

She strictly ate three square meals a day, never smoked a cigarette in her life, and she consumed one cocktail a year on Christmas Eve.  She played the odds and still passed away at a very young age.

Playing the Odds Also Leads to “Financial” Health

At this point, you’re probably wondering what this has to do with financial health?

In short…everything!

When you read or listen to the majority of individuals (and, by extension, the financial media) talk about those who have achieved financial success, what do you hear?

  • Right Place, Right Time, Luck: Those who have done well had the luck of good timing, choosing to work for many years for company X vs. Y, the business they created benefitted from outside events, etc. and they earned a large income,
  • Trust fund kid, i.e. they inherited it (despite Forbes annual statistics of the remotely small minority to have sustained wealth coming from inheritance),
  • Magic Investment: they somehow obtained information, probably unethically or unfairly, that lead to a great investing outcome,
  • Education: they went to X school and thus had connections that nobody else had.

Do you see the commonality in all of this?

It all adds up to the belief that financial independence and success is all random, luck, and good fortune, and you have very little influence over the financial outcomes in your life.

As potentially mean spirited as this may sound, just as it is with the health examples I gave, it’s easy and convenient to believe that financial independence and success is all random, luck, and good fortune.

Believing that absolves them of the responsibility of focusing on the long-term and making the necessary choices you have made which have generated your total financial independence!

It’s easier to just block all of that out and focus on what brings instant, short term pleasure today, i.e. a new car I can’t afford, a 60-inch flat screen television, eating out five nights a week and running up the balance on my credit cards, or investing in a new “can’t miss hitting a home run” venture I heard about with money borrowed from my home equity line of credit.

Stark Contrast

The reality that I have witnessed amongst our Relaxing Retirement members over the last 30+ years is that almost none inherited anything.  The majority did not earn extraordinarily large incomes during their working years.  And, very, very few went to Harvard or Yale!

The reason they have achieved total financial independence has nothing to do with any of the traditional dogma most folks conveniently buy into, or that Hollywood loves to portray and demonize.

They made decisions long ago that they stuck with over their lifetime to spend much less than they made, i.e. live within their means, and save and intelligently invest the difference.

They took 100% responsibility for the outcome they’ve experienced.  They didn’t look for a mystical guarantee, or a magic pill (investment).

In short, they played the odds slow and steady.

And, this is what it all boils down to.  There are no guarantees and no magic pills, so you may alert anyone and everyone you know to call off the search.

There are, however, successful formulas built on highly probable odds in both health and finance that are in plain view for all of us to see.

I’ve often said that if I fail, it’s certainly not going to be because I wasn’t prepared or I wasn’t willing to accept 100% responsibility for whatever outcome I realized.

In health, and in finance, we should all welcome and take full advantage of the wonderful freedom we have to exercise control and choose our actions.  And, happily do whatever is necessary to play the odds at every turn.

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Total Financial Independence by Playing The Odds at Every Turn – Part I

Last summer, I had a “spirited” conversation with friends over dinner about health which led to some research on my part, and a revelation about the remarkable similarities to “financial health.”

This will take a moment to read, but I strongly recommend investing the time.  It’s that important!

The debate with our friends essentially boiled down to the leading causes of death and the role that luck and genetics play vs. the choices we make.

It all started when our friend said, “All your exercise and attention to healthy eating is great, but there’s no guarantee you won’t still drop dead of a heart attack.  My father and grandfather both died of a heart attack before they were 62.”

I’m sure you’ve heard some version of this comment before.  Ultimately, it’s the same as, “you can do everything right and still get hit by a bus!”  Or, “I know a guy who was healthy who collapsed and died while running.”

All of that may very well be true, but it certainly doesn’t change the facts about the overwhelming leading causes of death, and what those are predominantly attributable to.

Let’s look at some updated statistics I pulled from The World Health Organization website www.who.int about the leading causes of death (the italicizing and bolding is mine for emphasis).

World Health Organization

Non-communicable diseases (NCD) were responsible for 71% of all deaths globally in 2016, up from 68% in 2012 and 60% in 2000.

What’s even more telling is that NCDs account for 88% of deaths in upper and middle-income countries like the United States.  That’s remarkable!

Of the top 10 causes of death in upper and middle-income countries, only two are not NCDs: lower respiratory infections and road injuries which are numbers 6 and 8.

The 4 main Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease claimed 3.0 million lives in 2016, while lung cancer (along with trachea and bronchus cancers) caused 1.7 million deaths. Diabetes killed 1.6 million people in 2016, up from less than 1 million in 2000.

Deaths due to dementias more than doubled between 2000 and 2016, making it the 5th leading cause of global deaths in 2016 compared to 14th in 2000.

  1. Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs)

CVDs are the number one cause of death globally: More people die annually from CVDs than from any other cause.

An estimated 17.7 million people died from CVDs in 2015, representing 31% of all global deaths. Of these deaths, an estimated 7.4 million were due to coronary heart disease and 6.7 million were due to stroke.

Most cardiovascular diseases can be prevented by addressing behavioral risk factors such as tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity, physical inactivity and harmful use of alcohol using population-wide strategies.

  1. Cancer

Cancer is the second leading cause of death globally, with 8.8 million cancer related deaths in 2015.  Nearly one in six deaths is due to cancer.

Around one third of cancer deaths are due to the 5 leading behavioral and dietary risks: high body mass index, low fruit and vegetable intake, lack of physical activity, tobacco use, alcohol use.

Tobacco use is the most important risk factor for cancer causing around 22% of global cancer deaths.

  1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

It is estimated that 3 million deaths were caused by COPD in 2016, which is equal to 5% of all deaths globally that year, and 90% of those deaths occurred in low and middle-income countries.

The primary cause of COPD is exposure to tobacco smoke (through tobacco use or second-hand smoke).

Many cases of COPD are preventable by avoidance or early cessation of smoking.

  1. Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014!

In 2015, an estimated 1.6 million deaths were directly caused by diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world and is largely the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity.

Healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes.

What’s the Commonality?

As you read through all of this, do you notice any commonalities?

First, more than two thirds of all deaths (and 88% of deaths in upper income countries like the U.S.) are related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs), i.e. not an epidemic and not an accident.

Among the four leading NCDs, the startling commonality is that they are not random, and not genetic.  They’re primarily brought on by lifestyle choices and the physical effects these choices have on our body:

  • Eating: what do we eat, when do we eat, and how much do we eat?
  • Drinking: how much alcohol do we consume? How much water do we consume?
  • Smoking
  • Exercise: how often, and what type
  • Stress
  • Sleep: how much do you get, and what’s the quality of your sleep?

There’s No Guarantee

Armed with these statistics from the WHO, let’s now go back to my dinner conversation with our friend and her comment: “All your exercise and attention to healthy eating is great, but there’s no guarantee you won’t still drop dead of a heart attack.  My father and grandfather both died of a heart attack before they were 62.”

I again sympathize with the loss of her father and grandfather because I lost my mother to cancer at age 57, but the fact that they both died of a heart attack before age 62 doesn’t necessarily suggest that it was genetic.  What are the chances that their lifestyle choices, and the negative long-term effects they had on their bodies, were similar?

More important, however, was our friend’s choice of the word “guarantee.”  It’s a very, very important word and one that led to my “revelation” about financial health.

Everyone desires certainty in their lives.  Most would prefer guarantees with everything (health, finances, etc.)

Unfortunately for the majority who seek it, life is not a straight line.  There are virtually no guaranteed results in anything.

Given this, to achieve whatever it is that you want, use your freedom to choose.

Research and Play the Odds at Every Turn!

In health, it’s 100% true that you could get hit by a bus and die.  It’s also true that genetics plays a role in your longevity.

However, as The World Health Organization statistics suggest, the tremendous news is your lifestyle choices have a far, far greater impact on your health, vitality, and ultimately, your longevity.

If you have a sincere desire to be healthy and live a long life, why would you not study how to eat better, drink much more water and less alcohol, stop smoking cigarettes, and exercise rigorously on a daily basis.

Those like our friend who choose to focus on the role that genetics or accidents play in our long-term health, etc. prefer believing it’s out of their control because it absolves them of any responsibility or role in the outcome.  After all, “there’s no guarantee.”

What they’re really saying is they prefer not to make the proper choices and just do whatever feels good in the moment without any regard to the long-term ramifications.

It’s easier to say it’s out of our control, it’s random, or it’s predetermined.

However, that’s a rejection of the reality that we all have the freedom to make the choice to play the odds at every turn and reap the rewards the statistics demonstrate.

Stay tuned for the next edition as I reveal my revelation, i.e. the remarkable analogy to financial health!

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